Doblin CEO says innovation isn't luck – it can be driven by using smart tactics in unusual combinations.

Now and then industries change fundamentally. This doesn’t occur often and is usually the result of some profound technological disruption. As an illustration, only a person born before 1970 will remember life prior to the impact of personal computers. For children born later, that time before the digital era seems quaint and vaguely ancient. One consequence of such epochal change: virtually all players are affected downstream in a massive cascade.

One of the few clichés about innovation that’s actually true is the one that says necessity is the mother of invention. In the early days of the digital revolution, technology pioneer Alan Kay, working at the time on the ARPA project at the University of Utah, thought about the software challenge and helped to pioneer object-oriented programming (OOP). This revolutionary new approach had one key insight at its core: building a programming language around the idea of reusable modules. With OOP, objects are data, files, and other common computing elements, described distinctly. Then, other related objects can be swiftly created, identified, or managed by the system. Most tasks can be described as methods or subroutines and made efficient, repeatable, and easily managed without lots of buggy code that needs to be custom developed for every new task.

PREMIUM SUBSCRIPTION CONTENT
This content is available for Premium Subscribers only.
Already a subscriber? Log in