Somehow, seeing people touch real versions of iOS 6 design elements makes them seem more ridiculous.

Before Apple came out with iOS 7 for its mobile devices, the company and its Senior Vice President of Design Jony Ive took aim at eliminating skeuomorphism, the tendency to imitate the textures, functionality and limitations of actual-world items – such as a felt pool table in the Game Center or the “cheesy” wood grain in iBooks. The inertia (both from processing speeds and clunky animations) was streamlined out and the resulting new OS, oddly, is more touchable than the original designs that so aspired to approachability. A group of British animation students at Kingston University, however, found the recently discarded designs irresistible, and crafted a huge mock-iPhone with moving “onscreen” parts from paper, plywood and fiberboard. The animated result, in the words of Fast Company, creates a “cognitive dissonance by mirroring iOS through its real-world cues.”

UP YOUR QUOTA FOR JUST $15 A MONTH
PSFK’s Premium Subscription provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles featuring new ideas, interviews, analysis and opinion on the latest innovation in brand, customer and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in
(powered by Wallkit)