Researchers have developed a brain-controlled music player to help improve the life of people with severely limited motor abilities.

Researchers at the University of Malta have created a music player that can be controlled by brain waves.

The research team, who are engineers from the Department of Systems and Control Engineering and the Centre for Biomedical Cybernetics, studied various ways to get the desired brain response to create the system. Users can control the music player just by looking at different flickering boxes on a computer screen. The brain activity is read via electroencephalography (EEG) or through electrodes placed on different locations on the person's scalp. The EEG readings are then converted into computer commands — allowing the user to control the music player without touching it at all.

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