Can something be called an ad if it doesn't tell you anything about the product it's pushing?

You've known for weeks that the trailer for the third installment of your favorite video game was coming out, and on the day it's released you anxiously pull up YouTube or your favorite gaming site to check it out. You wonder if this next version will have better graphics, a cooler storyline, additional game-play options, or more weapons available to complete your missions, but when you check out the trailer none of those questions are answered. You see no intro, no stills, and learn nothing about how this game might be different from the previous two. Instead, you almost feel like you're watching a news special about what's going on with the military.

READ THIS ARTICLE FOR $15
$15 provides access to this article and every case-study, interview, and analysis piece that we publish for the next 30 days. Our Premium Subscription also provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles on innovation in brand, customer, and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in