Artist Jonathon Keats' surveillance cameras will hold our generation accountable for cities' future development.

Imagine if secret cameras had been set up around Manhattan in 1914, taking one long exposure of the city that was only revealed to the public this year. It would be quite a way to document the impact that a century can have on a city. In 2114, citizens of Berlin will be given the chance to do just that, viewing images of a hundred-year-long exposure at an already planned exhibition.

Artist Jonathon Keats has designed a surveillance unit that has a century-long exposure time, so it can capture the gradual change of a city over the years. Working with the Team Titanic gallery, the unauthorized urban project will see 100 of these Century Cameras hidden all across Berlin next week. The cameras serve not only as a way to uniquely document the passing of time, but also as a way to hold present-day Berliners accountable for their city’s future.

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