The tech giant has pledged $50 million towards endeavors aimed at encouraging women and girls to get their code on.

To anyone with knowledge of the stereotypes and cultural tropes around programmer culture, the fact that men greatly outnumber women in the field comes as no surprise. You might not know, however, that the picture has gotten worse. According to Chelsea Clinton, vice president of the Clinton Foundation, women comprised 37 percent of computer science graduates in the mid-80's, but today make up less than 16 percent. Even worse, African Americans only account for about 3 percent of scientists and engineers. What is perhaps the biggest employer in the tech scene – Google – acknowledged this growing inequality at its own I/O conference and is throwing its massive funds and clout behind addressing it.

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