This week’s innovations include a health sensor made from graphene and a shirt that can detect epileptic seizures.

Each week PSFK.com with its partner Boehringer Ingelheim brings you a snapshot of five innovative ideas that are reshaping the health care industry. This week’s innovations include a health sensor made from graphene and a shirt that can detect epileptic seizures. Be sure to check out Boehringer Ingelheim’s Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest pages to stay on top of all things health. 

Graphene Transforms Rubber Bands Into Full-Fledged Medical Sensors Graphene is a material that exhibits exceptional strength and provides an electromechanical response to movement when deformed, which has been revolutionizing the world of materials science. Researchers from Trinity College Dublin and the University of Surrey in the UK have used this material to transform a cheap but highly elastic material, a rubber band, into a high performance strain sensor, called the G-band. The stretchy material senses motion such as breathing, pulse and joint movement and could be used to create lightweight sensor suits for vulnerable patients such as premature babies, making it possible to remotely monitor their subtle movements and alert a doctor to any worrying behaviours. In the world of activity monitoring, where hard electronic technologies are struggling to adhere and conform to the human form, a flexible sensor like this opens up very interesting product design possibilities.

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