Tableware designed to match meals to nutrition and portion recommendations helps thoughtful eating require less thought and more enjoyment

Nutritional science has known for decades, and the public has known since the 2006 release of Brian Wansink's Mindless Eating, that the single most important factor in how much people eat is how much food people are given. Its a simple fact of food consumption that is too often exacerbated by large dinner plates, super-sizing and all-you-can-eat appetizer deals at your favorite restaurant.

Dutch designer Annet Bruil saw the problem, and offers a solution in her ETE plate. It's a “pie chart” for the meal you eat before your pie. The simple, white plate has lines drawn on it dividing its surface into sections for vegetables, carbohydrates and proteins. The size of the plate keeps your total amount of food in line with daily calorie requirements, and the dividing lines keep the relative proportions in line with what nutritionists recommend.

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