Manufacturers overseas are taking it upon themselves to tackle the challenges of implementing sustainability as a core business model, but this is just the first step along a much longer path

This is the fourth article of a 4-part series that investigates the findings in the latest sustainability report from PCH. Also check out the first, second and third articles in the series. Produced in partnership with PCH – click here for the full report.

As consumers we are most familiar with the final stage of a product–the item and its packaging, and some basic information about where it was produced, but thanks to today’s information age a product’s backstory is becoming just as important in the minds of consumers. Look no further than the success of brands like Patagonia or TOMS to see that the topic of ‘sustainability’ has gained traction in the minds of consumers and producers alike. And while we all may agree that the products we purchase should be produced in a more sustainable way, the realities of achieving those standards is a long process requiring both innovation in its truest sense and an unwavering commitment to instilling new standards into methods of production. In part response to a growing consumer and producer demand, and in part because it is simply the right thing to do, a handful of manufacturers overseas are taking it upon themselves to tackle the challenges of implementing sustainability as a core business model, but there is still a ways to go.

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