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What’s For Dinner? Depends, What’s Your Blood Type?

What’s For Dinner? Depends, What’s Your Blood Type?
Arts & Culture

A Thai restaurant helps diners navigate their menu based on their blood type

Leo Lutero
  • 28 september 2015

Blood typing plays a key role in healthcare but Bangkok-based restaurant The Third Floor thinks it should also determine what you eat from their menu. Offering a substantial fare of meat, fish and vegetables, their menu advises diners based on their blood type.

The restaurant’s website doesn’t indicate on-site blood testing so patrons better come in the know. A peek into the menu indicates that Thai restaurant strikes a balance between healthy and indulgent dishes. True to Thai cuisine, meats are often paired with fresh greens and rich (spicy) sauces. But what stands out are the letters “O”, “A”, “B” and “AB” that advises you on what to order, printed appropriately in a bleeding font.

thai restaurant food 1.png

The restaurant culls Japanese beliefs around blood types. Blood-typing in Japanese culture entrusts the three letters to determine your ideal diet and exercise. The restaurant even throws in a chart that shows your moods according to blood type for good measure. If you’re with someone being picky about their dish, they’re probably Type A.

The diet-blood type relationships claim to come early in human civilization. Type A’s have roots in agriculture, so a diet of grains, vegetables and fruits should outweigh dairy and meat. Type B’s are believed to come form nomadic tribes and are able to digest most food groups. Chicken, noodles and corn are believed to be fattening for B individuals.

Type AB’s have traits of both but good balance between dairy and meat products is crucial. Type O’s match well with low-fat meats, since they have evolved from more carnivorous tribes.

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Despite these prescriptions, choices from the menu remain substantial. If you’re a Type O eyeing a filling dinner, you can choose from beef tongue stew, baked rice with turkey or lamb goulash with pumpkin.

The science behind the role of blood type in our diets, metabolism and personalities isn’t totally clear. In the West, the concept of blood type-restricted diets was introduced by naturopathic doctor Peter J. D’Adamo which, more or less, aligns with the Japanese principles.


Lead and feature:

Fresh raw meat via Shutterstock

Butcher at Market la Boqueria via Shutterstock 

+blood type
+culture
+Culture
+Europe
+fitness / sport
+Food
+Health
+menu
+middle east
+restaurant
+retail
+thailand
+The Third Floor
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