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Sound Cocoon Turns Your Motion Into Music

Sound Cocoon Turns Your Motion Into Music
Gaming & Play

The hammock was created by acoustics experts to detect movement and translate it into song

Ido Lechner, Home Editor
  • 27 july 2016

Architectural acoustics expert Dave Rife and studio engineer Gabe Liberti (Dave & Gabe) have teamed up to create Hyper Thread, a sound cocoon—or tent, for reference—which houses seven silk hammocks with cushioned seats. The seats have built-in sensors which detect motion; as you swing around, the momentum and positioning of the hammocks change the part of the track they’re responsible for. In total, there are seven songs which cycle throughout the installation.

The songs project from 24 speakers hidden throughout the silk-clad dome, and a web of LED lights matched to the music and motion oscillate patterns of color. A buffered portal greets guests by slowly transporting them from the exterior sound space into this one; the shift from the outside world into Hyper Thread is audible.

Dave & Gabe, who run their own experiential art installation gallery, saw the piece debut in the Panorama Festival.

Dave & Gabe

+acoustics
+Architecture
+Entertainment
+Furniture
+Hyper Thread
+play
+Sound Cocoon

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