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NASA Brings Artificial Intelligence To Firefighters

NASA Brings Artificial Intelligence To Firefighters
AI

Partnered with wearables, AI is being used to make first responders safer on the job

Leo Lutero
  • 2 september 2016

Firefighters have a truly noble job as their responsibilities often require putting one’s own life on the line. A NASA researcher is using the Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction, and sYnthesis (AUDREY), an artificial intelligence tool, to make a day’s work a bit easier and safer for these heroes.

The IoT-powered system will work with wearables that will track a firefighter’s location via GPS and record heat and air quality in the specific points as they go around the site of the emergency. All this data is then tied-up with satellite imagery of the scene to build a game plan.

AUDREY can lead a team of firefighters: artificial intelligence will determine which areas would likely collapse in an emergency and help any number of firefighters work together as efficiently as possible. With the system, firefighters won’t run the risk of going inside dangerous areas and  will always have access to data on the status of the entire site.

NASA

Lead Image: New artificial intelligence technology, developed jointly by the Jet Propulsion Lab and the Department of Homeland Security, could one day guide first responders in the field. Image Credit: USAF photo/Tech. Sgt. Rey Ramon

+artificial intelligence
+audrey
+firefighter
+firefighting
+GPS
+IoT
+nasa
+research
+technology
+wearable technology
+wearables

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