3D-Printed Sculptures Move And Bloom Realistically

3D-Printed Sculptures Move And Bloom Realistically
Design

Artist John Edmark created sculptural plants and flowers according to the golden ratio

Zack Palm
  • 27 january 2017

Artist and designer John Edmark took a math lesson from nature and applied it to his work. As a result, he created Blooms, a series of 3D-printed sculptures he made using the Fibonacci Spiral commonly found on plants and flowers. When these pieces spin in place under a strobe light, they appear to grow.

3D-Printed Sculptures
Edmark rotates the collection to make them appear as if they magically move and branch out. This was achieved using progressive rotations calculated according to the golden ratio. A bloom effect happens at the angular version on phi, or 137.5 degrees. Every time the sculptures hits 137.5 degrees, the bloom effect kicks in and provides the sculpture’s illusion of movement.

John Edmark

Artist and designer John Edmark took a math lesson from nature and applied it to his work. As a result, he created Blooms, a series of 3D-printed sculptures he made using the Fibonacci Spiral commonly found on plants and flowers. When these pieces spin in place under a strobe light, they appear to grow.

+3d printed
+Arts & Culture
+arts & culture
+light
+sculptures

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