Visitors to the country will be able to walk straight to baggage claim without having to show documents

Anyone who has visited a foreign country will tell you that going through immigration after the end of a flight is a huge pain. Australia is hoping to make immigration proceedings painless by letting passengers go to baggage claim without showing a passport or even speaking to an immigration officer. Labeled the Seamless Traveller initiative, the government hopes to reduce unnecessary red tape through the use of automated biometric processing.

Over $97.3 million dollars will be spent on making this initiative come to fruition. The hope is that around 90 percent of travelers will be able to seamlessly pass through, allowing officers to spend time on passengers that may be security risks. Identification via biometrics is a new avenue that some governments are exploring to keep tabs on citizens and visitors. Although there are many benefits, there are some confidentiality risks involved. Technology sometimes can get it wrong and as we saw in the past U.S. elections, governments are not exactly impervious to hacking.

The Hon. Peter Dutton MP (Minister for Immigration and Border Protection)

Biometric security via Shutterstock

Anyone who has visited a foreign country will tell you that going through immigration after the end of a flight is a huge pain. Australia is hoping to make immigration proceedings painless by letting passengers go to baggage claim without showing a passport or even speaking to an immigration officer. Labeled the Seamless Traveller initiative, the government hopes to reduce unnecessary red tape through the use of automated biometric processing.

Over $97.3 million dollars will be spent on making this initiative come to fruition. The hope is that around 90 percent of travelers will be able to seamlessly pass through, allowing officers to spend time on passengers that may be security risks. Identification via biometrics is a new avenue that some governments are exploring to keep tabs on citizens and visitors. Although there are many benefits, there are some confidentiality risks involved. Technology sometimes can get it wrong and as we saw in the past U.S. elections, governments are not exactly impervious to hacking.