Dior’s Frame-Maker Is Building Mind-Reading Smart Glasses

Dior’s Frame-Maker Is Building Mind-Reading Smart Glasses
Design

Safilo is developing eyewear that tracks brainwaves and sends the results to an app to help people assess their state of mind and help them relax and meditate

Anna Johansson
  • 12 january 2017

Remember the Google Glass? It was a form of smart glasses that could connect to your smartphone and perform simple smart tech functions on command. It didn’t go very far because the tech was too advanced and people weren’t ready for what it had to offer. But beyond that, the glasses were an eyesore. Safilo Group, Italian frame-makers for Dior, Fendi and Hugo Boss, are trying to change that. They’ve developed an attractive and high-tech pair of smart glasses that are designed to assess and improve the wearer’s mood.

These glasses are reported to be more like Snap Inc’s Spectacles which are stylish frames that can take photos of whatever’s in front of you and post it to SnapChat. Both Snap’s Spectacles and these new smart glasses have much more simplistic design and functionality in order to reach a much broader audience.

What makes these new glasses different to any others on the market is their unabashed lack of tech. Heck, Safilo’s glasses don’t even come with a camera, display or microphone. Instead, it has five sensors that are embedded into the earpieces and the bridge of the nose. These sensors aren’t noticeable to the wearer or spectators, taking away the futuristic cyborg look that people detested about Google Glass. With the sensors designed to measure brainwaves and send the results to an accompanying app, one can assess their mood and emotions. If they are feeling stressed out, they can take steps to relax and meditate.

Safilo believes that their fashion sense as a brand name manufacturer will be enough to gain attention from those who steered away from Google Glass.

“Consumers shouldn’t have to make sacrifices in order to get the technology,” Safilo Group CEO Luisa Delgado said.

The glasses debuted at CES 2017. Safilo is the third largest frame maker in the world, behind Luxottica and Essilor and are looking to remain in this leading-edge position through this new tech innovation. Its smart glasses are slated for release in Summer 2018 in the United States.

Safilo Group

For more information on what to see a CES, check out our CES Guide 2017!

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The PSFK CES Guide 2017 helps creative professionals attending CES or following along globally to track the latest innovations in consumer technology. Guides are available for mobile, desktop or print-ready format—download them here. Access and share the PSFK CES Guide 2017 on Slideshare here. For a more detailed survey of changing consumer expectations, access PSFK’s Forecast 2020.

Remember the Google Glass? It was a form of smart glasses that could connect to your smartphone and perform simple smart tech functions on command. It didn’t go very far because the tech was too advanced and people weren’t ready for what it had to offer. But beyond that, the glasses were an eyesore. Safilo Group, Italian frame-makers for Dior, Fendi and Hugo Boss, are trying to change that. They’ve developed an attractive and high-tech pair of smart glasses that are designed to assess and improve the wearer’s mood.

+Design
+Fashion
+google glass
+smart glasses
+spectacles
+technology
+wearable technology

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