Artist Benetto Bufalino's latest installation in Lyon, France is meant to turn a night-time work site into a party for passersby

From upside down cars-turned-playable-pingpong-tables to aquariums built from telephone booths, Benetto Bufalino likes to turn things on their head and his most recent work is no different. The French artist’s latest installation in Lyon, France is a disco ball cement mixer, meant to turn a night-time construction site into a party for passersby.

While nearby residents trying to get some shuteye may not be happy with the glimmers that periodically trickle through their windows, not only does the cement mixer double as a party starter, it also provides an alternative method for illumination in darker neighborhoods. Assuming construction workers can find ways to keep noise levels down in the later hours of the day, the artwork may afford even more practicality than initially expected by letting cities build and refurbish at night when less cars are on the road. Until then, we’ll just have to celebrate around the unexpected mirror tiles.

Benetto Bufalino

From upside down cars-turned-playable-pingpong-tables to aquariums built from telephone booths, Benetto Bufalino likes to turn things on their head and his most recent work is no different. The French artist’s latest installation in Lyon, France is a disco ball cement mixer, meant to turn a night-time construction site into a party for passersby.

While nearby residents trying to get some shuteye may not be happy with the glimmers that periodically trickle through their windows, not only does the cement mixer double as a party starter, it also provides an alternative method for illumination in darker neighborhoods. Assuming construction workers can find ways to keep noise levels down in the later hours of the day, the artwork may afford even more practicality than initially expected by letting cities build and refurbish at night when less cars are on the road. Until then, we’ll just have to celebrate around the unexpected mirror tiles.