Showcased at CES 2017, Divergent is trying to change how vehicles are produced outside of assembly lines

In the future, you'll be able to save yourself a trip to the local car dealer as you'll be able to print your dream car yourself! Thanks to Divergent, a green automotive manufacturing company, soon you could be driving around in ‘Blade'—a car built entirely using a 3D printer.  Using less power than a traditional or electronic car requires for production, the 3D-printed conceptual car was presented at CES 2017.

Blade’s structure does not resemble a traditional 3D-printed vehicle in the slightest, as the average car is rougher around the edges and block-like. With a sharper form, similar to a European sports car, all of the parts were created using a 3D printing unit, save for the carbon fiber reinforcements and tires. The parts were put together by melting them to a solid form, making it appear like the car had come out of the printer completed.

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Additionally, Blade also has a gasoline-powered engine, keeping it accessible to the general populace who may not feel ready to make the jump to an electric battery. This was decided because Divergent’s CEO Kevin Czinger believes there is a larger amount of pollution generated by the emissions of an operational manufacturing car plant than by the exhaust produced by the vehicles made by his company. Prior to their work on Blade, the engineers at Divergent reviewed the environmental impact that traditional and electric cars had during their life cycle.

The life cycles of the cars were defined from the point the core is removed from the ground to the time the metals are recycled. Their results showed that neither vehicle was environmentally friendly. Using this information, Divergent's designers explored what they could do at the assembly level to provide a cleaner and more efficient process for car factories to manufacture vehicles.

Blade’s development causes less environmental effects than a gasoline or hybrid car and will have one third the impact of an electric vehicle. By completing Blade, the executives at Divergent have shown they can make an automobile that works similarly to the ones on the market but emits less pollution. Rather than using an assembly line to put together these cars, this process uses a single tool, so car manufacturers do not require as much space to build their product.

Executives at Divergent have signed their first deal with French car manufacturer Peugeot.

Divergent

In the future, you'll be able to save yourself a trip to the local car dealer as you'll be able to print your dream car yourself! Thanks to Divergent, a green automotive manufacturing company, soon you could be driving around in ‘Blade'—a car built entirely using a 3D printer.  Using less power than a traditional or electronic car requires for production, the 3D-printed conceptual car was presented at CES 2017.

Blade’s structure does not resemble a traditional 3D-printed vehicle in the slightest, as the average car is rougher around the edges and block-like. With a sharper form, similar to a European sports car, all of the parts were created using a 3D printing unit, save for the carbon fiber reinforcements and tires. The parts were put together by melting them to a solid form, making it appear like the car had come out of the printer completed.