Researchers are looking into the possibilities of using the fungus mycelium as a leather replacement or a building material

Researchers have uncovered an alternative way to produce leather. MycoWorks, a San Francisco-based startup comprised of creative engineers, designers and scientists, has been heavily involved in researching the possible uses of fungus, specifically mycelium. Philip Ross, the CTO of MycoWorks, began experimenting with the material until he could create a piece of furniture. Eventually, the company could channel their material researching into applied solutions for modern society’s waste issues.

Mycelium_Can_Be_Used_As_An_Alternative_To_Leather.jpg
Other than creating leather and clothing, the company has also explored the possibility of using the sturdy material for buildings. For different applications, scientists just need to manipulate the temperature, light, food and humidity of the mycelium to have it gain specific traits. The material could have a huge environmental impact, as production uses far less resources than farming livestock. The leather is not yet publicly available, but the company hopes to market an applied solution soon.

MycoWorks

Researchers have uncovered an alternative way to produce leather. MycoWorks, a San Francisco-based startup comprised of creative engineers, designers and scientists, has been heavily involved in researching the possible uses of fungus, specifically mycelium. Philip Ross, the CTO of MycoWorks, began experimenting with the material until he could create a piece of furniture. Eventually, the company could channel their material researching into applied solutions for modern society’s waste issues.