Home Has A Built-In Separation Of Work And Life

Home Has A Built-In Separation Of Work And Life
Design

The structure features distinct working and living spaces in connected identical buildings

Cristina DiGiacomo
  • 9 january 2017

Tired of your long work commute? But revel in the fact that you can truly “leave your work at the office” when the clock strikes 6pm?  Offering the best of both worlds Petr Stolin and Alena Micekova, the architects behind Zen Houses, have designed a way for people to bring their living and working spaces closer together but still keep them divided. Utilizing two rectangular spaces separated by an elevated walkway, a garden patch and a large tree, residents can rise and shine in the morning, get their caffeine fix in their very own kitchen and then walk to work in just a few milliseconds seconds via a hallway to a separate building entirely.

Zen-Houses-Petr-Stolin-6

Embodying the signature essence of all Zen Houses, the buildings each have their own Japanese inspired structure, color scheme and interior space. One acts as a working studio; the other your domicile. Rectangular in nature, they are made of wooden beams, plywood, raw metal, along with having a see-through exterior.

Designed in an effort to combat the increasing demands people have to be connected to their work, the home demonstrates how one’s personal space and working life don’t have to be combined, but rather can exist in symbiosis with one another.

Reminiscent of other work and life space design experiments such as  WeWork’s WeLive program, new innovations are incorporating new ways of thinking like the cross-pollination of values and traits of the “Domestic Executive”. As we continue to see an evaluation and re-imagining of traditional work, living design and socialization, there will be many opportunities for people to opt in to modes that serve their needs and skills best, whether they prefer separate spaces, communal living or shared setups like these.

Zen Houses offers a comfortable option for freelancers and remote workers who need a separate  working space, but can psychologically turn off when they need to.

Petr Stolin

 

Tired of your long work commute? But revel in the fact that you can truly “leave your work at the office” when the clock strikes 6pm?  Offering the best of both worlds Petr Stolin and Alena Micekova, the architects behind Zen Houses, have designed a way for people to bring their living and working spaces closer together but still keep them divided. Utilizing two rectangular spaces separated by an elevated walkway, a garden patch and a large tree, residents can rise and shine in the morning, get their caffeine fix in their very own kitchen and then walk to work in just a few milliseconds seconds via a hallway to a separate building entirely.

+Architecture
+Design
+home
+Interior Design
+living space
+work
+Workspace

Learn About Our Membership Services

Need Research Help?
As a member you can ask us any research questions and get complimentary research assistance with a 4-day turnaround. Reports inclde stats, quotes, and best-inclass examples on research topics.
Remain Informed & Strategic
We publish several trends reports each month. By becoming a member you will have access to over 100 existing reports, plus a growing catalog of deep topical analysis and debrief-style reports so you always remain in the know.
See Trends Come To Life
Meet your peers and immerse yourself in monthly trend and innovation webinars and discounted conferences.
No search results found.