Japanese Artist Turns Snowfall Into A Unique Wonderland

Japanese Artist Turns Snowfall Into A Unique Wonderland
Design

Toshihiko Shibuya is taking the natural beauty of freshly-fallen snow and turning it into an incredible hub of art sculptures

Anna Johansson
  • 5 january 2017

They don’t call snow-topped landscapes a “winter wonderland” for nothing. Japanese artist Toshihiko Shibuya wanted to elevate the beauty of freshly-fallen snow through an artistic innovation that uses snow as a blank canvas. Naturally he set the artwork in an area with plenty of snowfall—his hometown of Sapporo, Japan.

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In the ninth installment of his series Snow Pallet, Shibuya uses tiered iron sculptures that collect snow on different levels. The sculptures are varied in shape and placed randomly, but each has a flat surface where it can catch snow.

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He then painted the undersides of the sculptures with glowing, florescent paint.  As the snow fell, it piled beautifully atop the sculptures, stacking in different shapes depending on the size and shape of the structures.

After a snowstorm, the snow on the iron structures become denser, fluffy snow piles atop the painted sculptures. Sometimes icicles formed as well, dripping over the edge like clear crystals.

The beauty of Shibuya’s installation lies in the fact that art mixes perfectly with mother nature to create something truly spectacular. As snow is reflective by nature, although the paint is only on the flat underbelly of each sculpture, you can clearly see it reflecting off the surrounding snow almost in a glowing fashion, as if there were neon lights underneath. The appearance of each of these sculptures also changes depending on the amount and direction of the sunlight, giving off a reflection reminiscent of colorful hard candies.

Shibuya says he hopes his artwork will help people better appreciate the wonder of snowfall and nature, even in the bleakness of winter months. “Everybody tends to hate winter. But if you change your point of view, the possibilities for the future are wide open,” he said.

Shibuya’s signature artistic intention is to use the natural landscape of wherever he is located to create something beautiful. His Snow Pallet display is running through March 2017.

Toshihiko Shibuya

They don’t call snow-topped landscapes a “winter wonderland” for nothing. Japanese artist Toshihiko Shibuya wanted to elevate the beauty of freshly-fallen snow through an artistic innovation that uses snow as a blank canvas. Naturally he set the artwork in an area with plenty of snowfall—his hometown of Sapporo, Japan.

+arts
+Arts & Culture
+Asia
+Culture
+japan
+painting
+snow
+Winter

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