If accepted, the proposal would free traffic, save lives and promote the Filipino city's local culture

In response to Manila’s underdeveloped infrastructure, which has subsequently given rise to heavy traffic, public health issues, homelessness, pollution, water sanitation concerns and other serious problems, architect Jonathan Gayomali’s project Capsule Web proposes a solution inspired by cities such as La Paz and Medellin utilizing similar design work. In this proposition, a system of capsules and towers would offer an alternative connection from the slums to the railway, freeing the current transportation system from its ever-tight gridlock while helping to shuttle garbage and supplies in special-made capsules to uninhabited destinations.

eaywhsda6swsz20b.jpg

In addition to cleaning up Manila’s neighborhoods and granting wiggle room through the once-busy streets, Capsule Web would also offer shelter during the Philippine’s severe natural disasters (especially typhoons). The proposal would provide the means for inhabitants, especially those of informal developments, to reach safety during floods. In time, the towers could also become established community centers, with the backside storing emergency supplies, and the front side serving as flexible space for gatherings and events.

dnpiqdlg7txmjtjh.jpg
56dhealtcfptk62j.jpg

Capsule Web

In response to Manila’s underdeveloped infrastructure, which has subsequently given rise to heavy traffic, public health issues, homelessness, pollution, water sanitation concerns and other serious problems, architect Jonathan Gayomali’s project Capsule Web proposes a solution inspired by cities such as La Paz and Medellin utilizing similar design work. In this proposition, a system of capsules and towers would offer an alternative connection from the slums to the railway, freeing the current transportation system from its ever-tight gridlock while helping to shuttle garbage and supplies in special-made capsules to uninhabited destinations.