The Thames Museum is a proposal that features an “inverse fishbowl” window where people can see from inside the river’s changing elevation twice a day

The River Thames has played a crucial role in the history of London—a city founded on the river and because of the river. Looking to create a new and exciting museum space in the city, architect Evgeny Didorenko has released a conceptual proposal for the Thames River Museum, located on the Queens Quay—an underused portion of the North Bank.

To transform the space back into a public attraction, the proposal features three main sections: a pedestrian-friendly waterfront, the museum, and a public pool on top of the museum.

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The main attraction is the Thames Screen, a large “inverse fishbowl” window where visitors can see first-hand the river’s changing elevation twice a day, which reveals archaeological layers and is also a reflection on the city’s history and its oldest landmark.

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Thames River Museum

The River Thames has played a crucial role in the history of London—a city founded on the river and because of the river. Looking to create a new and exciting museum space in the city, architect Evgeny Didorenko has released a conceptual proposal for the Thames River Museum, located on the Queens Quay—an underused portion of the North Bank.

To transform the space back into a public attraction, the proposal features three main sections: a pedestrian-friendly waterfront, the museum, and a public pool on top of the museum.