shelfPoint uses special sensors in order to gauge customer's responses to products in real-time and adjust advertising accordingly

Marketing and advertising teams all over the industry would to love be able to read the emotions of their customers—to know exactly how their customers feel when they engage with their products. Thanks to facial detection software, they are getting one step closer to doing so. shelfPoint uses eye-level scanners to record how customers look when they see the product in question.

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These special scanners record the age, gender and ethnicity of the shopper as they look at the product. The sensor also changes the ads themselves in an attempt to change how the customer feels in real time and get them to purchases the product. As Cloverleaf CEO Gordon Davidson tells VentureBeat, “As people are walking by, we want to attract their attention, cause them to turn their head. Then what we do is we change the content and have more of a conversion story.” The system debuted at the National Retail Federation conference in New York at the beginning of January.

Early partners, like Dell, will use shelfPoint for their stores to track reactions to their products, which may mean more sales. Proctor & Gamble conducted a study that purchases increased by nearly 40 percents with shelfPoint than by using other, more traditional promotional materials. And for those worried about what these sensors might mean in terms of identification and surveillance:

“Facial recognition would suggest that we know who is there, and we’re looking at them. What we do is face detection, and so we do not retain or capture any personally identifiable information. We don’t record video or capture pictures. What we’re looking at is spots on the face, and then we translate that into metadata that says here’s the makeup of the individual that’s in front of it. We’d never be able to identify you,” Davidson said.

shelfPoint

Marketing and advertising teams all over the industry would to love be able to read the emotions of their customers—to know exactly how their customers feel when they engage with their products. Thanks to facial detection software, they are getting one step closer to doing so. shelfPoint uses eye-level scanners to record how customers look when they see the product in question.

These special scanners record the age, gender and ethnicity of the shopper as they look at the product. The sensor also changes the ads themselves in an attempt to change how the customer feels in real time and get them to purchases the product. As Cloverleaf CEO Gordon Davidson tells VentureBeat, “As people are walking by, we want to attract their attention, cause them to turn their head. Then what we do is we change the content and have more of a conversion story.” The system debuted at the National Retail Federation conference in New York at the beginning of January.