BBDO launched a new "Put Her On The Map" public awareness campaign

In an effort to raise the visibility and awareness of powerful and impactful women throughout history, BBDO Worldwide has launched a new campaign to name more American Landmarks after women. Currently 92% of outdoor monuments are dedicated to men in the U.S., even though half of the 320 million-plus people living in the country are women. This same imbalance applies to street and building names as well.

The campaign called Put Her On the Map aims to bring more attention to famous females by naming more public monuments after them as well as highlight the few monuments that are currently named after women. BBDO Worldwide debuted a film this week at the Makers Conference, an annual AOL-sponsored event celebrating trailblazing women of today and tomorrow. The video illustrates the problem with so few things named after successful women there is no precedent for female potential.

By honoring women leaders across the U.S., BBDO is hoping to help inspire the next generation of trailblazing Makers. Gloria Steinem said it best during her speech last month at the Women's March on Washington, “Women have always been an equal part of the past. We just haven't been a part of history.”

BBDO

In an effort to raise the visibility and awareness of powerful and impactful women throughout history, BBDO Worldwide has launched a new campaign to name more American Landmarks after women. Currently 92% of outdoor monuments are dedicated to men in the U.S., even though half of the 320 million-plus people living in the country are women. This same imbalance applies to street and building names as well.

The campaign called Put Her On the Map aims to bring more attention to famous females by naming more public monuments after them as well as highlight the few monuments that are currently named after women. BBDO Worldwide debuted a film this week at the Makers Conference, an annual AOL-sponsored event celebrating trailblazing women of today and tomorrow. The video illustrates the problem with so few things named after successful women there is no precedent for female potential.