Honoring 100 years of the minimalistic Dutch art movement, the city is erecting a series of art works inspired by De Stijl founder Piet Mondrian

The Hague, Netherlands is celebrating 100 years of the De Stijl art movement by recreating famed art works around the city. The year-long project has been dubbed “Mondrian to Dutch Design,” and will encapsulate a series of large scale art works inspired by Dutch-born artist and guiding force in the De Stijl art movement, Piet Mondrian.

The De Stijl art movement was founded in 1917 by Mondrian and artist Theo van Doesburg and is defined by an emphasis on simple, abstract, geometric shapes in primary or monochrome colors.

The first installation celebrating the movement has been unveiled on the facade of the The Hague’s city hall, made possible by using thin, stick-on plastic sheets in varying colors. The project has been undertaken by Madje Vollaers and Pascal Zwart of Rotterdam-based interdisciplinary design studio, Studio Vollaerszwart.

The city plans to unveil its next Mondrian piece of floating cubical pontoons on the Hofvijver, the small lake in front of the age-old Dutch parliament.

Studio Vollaerszwart

The Hague, Netherlands is celebrating 100 years of the De Stijl art movement by recreating famed art works around the city. The year-long project has been dubbed “Mondrian to Dutch Design,” and will encapsulate a series of large scale art works inspired by Dutch-born artist and guiding force in the De Stijl art movement, Piet Mondrian.

The De Stijl art movement was founded in 1917 by Mondrian and artist Theo van Doesburg and is defined by an emphasis on simple, abstract, geometric shapes in primary or monochrome colors.