The Public Art Fund's 40th anniversary is celebrated by swapping ads for art

If you are a native New Yorker, it is a natural instinct to avoid Times Square. Not only is it crowded with tourists, it also is overwhelmed with flashy advertisements. However, it may finally be worth it for natives to stop by thanks to the Public Art Fund‘s public exhibition, Commercial Break. The exhibition is located all over the city, appearing on billboards, even kiosks and other digital screens.

Commercial Break's curators are Emma Enderby and Daniel S. Palmer and they have picked the work of 23 artists to be displayed. The art scheduled to be displayed is constantly different, thanks to their digital nature.

The purpose of this show is to display a “new generation working in digital media to create interventions that resonate with today’s world.” These visual feeds are a reflection of the human experience in the current era, from politics to the topic of inclusion.

This exhibition is special because these artists get to show their work to a large, powerful space and it embraces a new medium as a form of inclusivity. In a world where technology continues to dominate with its influence, it is a chance for artists to respond to how this intersects with their life and work.

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.41.41 AM.png

Public Art Fund

If you are a native New Yorker, it is a natural instinct to avoid Times Square. Not only is it crowded with tourists, it also is overwhelmed with flashy advertisements. However, it may finally be worth it for natives to stop by thanks to the Public Art Fund‘s public exhibition, Commercial Break. The exhibition is located all over the city, appearing on billboards, even kiosks and other digital screens.

Commercial Break's curators are Emma Enderby and Daniel S. Palmer and they have picked the work of 23 artists to be displayed. The art scheduled to be displayed is constantly different, thanks to their digital nature.