Hamdan poses as a period-tracking app, but in reality it features information about STDs, birth control, domestic violence and marriage contracts

There are countless smartphone apps designed to help women keep track of their menstrual cycle, but a new one launched in Iran earlier this month has been developed for much more. Hamdan is posing as a period-tracking app, but in reality it features information about STDs, birth control, domestic violence and marriage contracts. All taboo subjects, and extremely difficult for women in Iran to obtain helpful knowledge on. The app was originally a product of IranCubator—a San Francisco nonprofit that works for “civil liberties in Iran” through smartphone applications designed for social good.

“We create opportunities to break the walls of censorship, isolation, and oppression. We focus on mobile applications that are secure, simple, and robust that allow people in country to organize, to communicate, and to raise their voices,” reads the nonprofit's mission statement.

Hamdan provides Iranian women with helpful legal language to navigate marriage contracts which often favor the husband, child custody battles, and when filing for divorce. It also delves into basic rights such as education and the ability to work.

Taking advantage of the popularity of Androids in Iran, the app has launched on the device to target as many women as possible. It can also be downloaded on Telegram, the favored messaging application of the country.

The app is the first of its kind to use the Persian calendar and features languages that are accessible to all Iranians, not just a select few.

IranCubator

There are countless smartphone apps designed to help women keep track of their menstrual cycle, but a new one launched in Iran earlier this month has been developed for much more. Hamdan is posing as a period-tracking app, but in reality it features information about STDs, birth control, domestic violence and marriage contracts. All taboo subjects, and extremely difficult for women in Iran to obtain helpful knowledge on. The app was originally a product of IranCubator—a San Francisco nonprofit that works for “civil liberties in Iran” through smartphone applications designed for social good.