Ripple wants to provide wearers with notifications about others who are admiring them from afar

Meeting people in public becomes far easier with the tentacle-like wearable called Ripple. The wearable device was created by students from the Royal College of Art in London.

Two cameras were installed on the wearable to observe other people around the wearer. The cameras are looking for individuals whose gaze lingers longer on the wearer than standard. To find the person in a crowd, the wearer has to face them, which makes it a small guessing game. When they're facing the correct direction of the would-be suitor, the device provides a small tap to the chest. If the admirer and wearer continue to share eye contact, Ripple takes this as a sign of mutual attraction. This instructs the tentacles on Ripple to start dancing and move in the direction of the admirer.

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The students created the wearable device to potentially encourage people away from an increasingly virtual world, making it easier to speak to someone face to face.

Ripple

Meeting people in public becomes far easier with the tentacle-like wearable called Ripple. The wearable device was created by students from the Royal College of Art in London.

Two cameras were installed on the wearable to observe other people around the wearer. The cameras are looking for individuals whose gaze lingers longer on the wearer than standard. To find the person in a crowd, the wearer has to face them, which makes it a small guessing game. When they're facing the correct direction of the would-be suitor, the device provides a small tap to the chest. If the admirer and wearer continue to share eye contact, Ripple takes this as a sign of mutual attraction. This instructs the tentacles on Ripple to start dancing and move in the direction of the admirer.