The fast food chain created an ad that elicits a response from people's Google Home devices, a move many have called invasive

A good advertisement will hook customers in, inspiring them buy, research or discuss the targeted product.  Fast food chain Burger King has found a way to force people to look up their famous Whopper. How? By getting their Google Assistant to do it for them, whether they want it to or not.

For anyone with a Google Home device listening to Burger King's “Connected Whopper” advertisement, their devices look up the Whopper and read the first sentence of its Wikipedia page. Many customers report the device responding when the actor says “OK Google,” which was deemed somewhat invasive and drawing the ire of media outlets and tech consumers alike. However, Google was swift to act, disabling the ad's ability to elicit a response within a few hours, most likely by likely registering the sound clip so that it is disabled.

Watch the ad that tried to take over phones below:

Burger King

A good advertisement will hook customers in, inspiring them buy, research or discuss the targeted product.  Fast food chain Burger King has found a way to force people to look up their famous Whopper. How? By getting their Google Assistant to do it for them, whether they want it to or not.

For anyone with a Google Home device listening to Burger King's “Connected Whopper” advertisement, their devices look up the Whopper and read the first sentence of its Wikipedia page. Many customers report the device responding when the actor says “OK Google,” which was deemed somewhat invasive and drawing the ire of media outlets and tech consumers alike. However, Google was swift to act, disabling the ad's ability to elicit a response within a few hours, most likely by likely registering the sound clip so that it is disabled.