Everything is a game that attempts to encapsulate just that: everything from the smallest of organisms to the expanse of the solar system

Videogames typically lay out a set of clear objectives for a player. The player knows the setting they're in and what they're supposed to accomplish next, by either saving the world they're in or following the story of the protagonist or protagonists as written by the developers. The game Everything, developed by artist David O'Reilly, best known for designing the videogame sequences for the movie Her, has the player exploring a procedurally generated planet through the eyes of the organisms on said planet.

The player can even expand their perspective to go beyond the frame of the virtual world's solar system.

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The player starts the game from unique vantage points, such as a tree in the middle of a forest, a butterfly landing on a flower, or a penguin on a block of ice. Though the player starts as a particular creature or entity, they can explore the world around them by freely moving around to find other creatures to later turn into. When a creature first pops into the player's screen, they will have a series of question marks under their name. It's only when the player becomes that creature do they gain a name.

As the player explores the world they can move to various levels of play, becoming a larger creature, like a polar bear, or a smaller organism like an aphid, or even traces of pollen floating between flowers. The player can also expand their perspective. They can choose to zoom out to become a large continent, rolling through the sea to find smaller islands, or expand further out to become the planet itself and explore the solar system as a result.

When the player has ascended as far as they can, they return to the perspective of an atom and start over again.

Throughout the game, players build on the categories of the world. When they become a new bug, it adds to a collective journal showing a percentage of how many more they have to become until a category is completed. Anything a player becomes fits under one category or another.

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Everything boasts a different kind of gameplay than what most videogames possess, and that's okay because, while it is a videogame, it's designed for players to explore and learn about the world in a relaxing manner. It's not made to have an end goal, it's not designed with traditional quests in mind. All of the gameplay gets is left to the whims of the player, with them deciding where they go and what they see.

The game may not appeal to everyone who normally plays videogames. Everything feels more like an interactive art piece than a videogame, but it can provide users with a different variation of gameplay than they're used to. Players can choose to use it as a way to relax as they explore the generated world, choosing to roll around as a rock or explore a planet as a floating piece of pollen.

Everything has already released on the PlayStation 4, and arrives on Steam April 21.

Everything

Videogames typically lay out a set of clear objectives for a player. The player knows the setting they're in and what they're supposed to accomplish next, by either saving the world they're in or following the story of the protagonist or protagonists as written by the developers. The game Everything, developed by artist David O'Reilly, best known for designing the videogame sequences for the movie Her, has the player exploring a procedurally generated planet through the eyes of the organisms on said planet.