High in protein and fiber, ReGrained bars could be a beer lover's dream come true

The San Francisco-based startup ReGrained wants you to have your beer and eat it too. Motivated by tackling inefficiencies in the food system, and especially in the beer making process, the company is set to reuse the “spent” grains leftover from the brewing process and turn them into nutrient-dense granola bars.

A six-pack of beer uses roughly one pound of grain. During the brewing process, the yeast feed off of the sugar in the cereal and once the process is over, the used grains are discarded. ReGrained takes those leftover cereals that are high in protein (by weight, close to as much as almonds) and fiber (more than 3x that of oatmeal) and low in sugar (since it ends up in the beer).

granola PSFK.com
While ReGrained currently offers mouth-watering flavors such as honey cinnamon IPA and coffee chocolate stout, the company is set to expand its business to soon also offer breads, cookies, cereals and chips.

ReGrained

The San Francisco-based startup ReGrained wants you to have your beer and eat it too. Motivated by tackling inefficiencies in the food system, and especially in the beer making process, the company is set to reuse the “spent” grains leftover from the brewing process and turn them into nutrient-dense granola bars.

A six-pack of beer uses roughly one pound of grain. During the brewing process, the yeast feed off of the sugar in the cereal and once the process is over, the used grains are discarded. ReGrained takes those leftover cereals that are high in protein (by weight, close to as much as almonds) and fiber (more than 3x that of oatmeal) and low in sugar (since it ends up in the beer).