The shifting living quarters has four distinct spaces it can swap to, each with various hidden compartments

With the price of traditional homes and rent for apartments in larger cities rising, residents want to find cheaper living solutions. This has prompted companies to create modular cabins, or redesigning storage containers, to serve as a home. George Clarke, a British architect featured in numerous television shows, and designer William Hardie created a prototype of the Rotating Home, a location that contains four rooms in one space by rotating its interior a full 360 degrees in 90-degree intervals.

Clarke built a control room to manage all of the rotations in the home. The control room remains in the same location outside of the house, with a bathroom behind it that also does not move. The house has four different buttons to change to the various different rooms inside. Depending on what side the house moves to, a series of soothing lights switch on to match the theme of the room, such as orange lights while on the kitchen side.

With a flip of a switch, the home rotates 90 degrees to transform from a welcoming living room into a fully stocked kitchen with a mirrored dining room table rising up from the floor. When the owner switches to the kitchen side, they can find all of their cutlery and utensils in a compartment alongside the wall, held inside by magnets.

Clarke included hidden walls and storage compartments on every side of the rotating home.

Each side of the Rotating Home bears its own unique twist of comfort. When the owner finishes with dinner, they can switch back to their living room with the dining table sinking into the floor so as to turn into a television set. A sofa suitable for four lifts up in front of the television with a mini fridge not too far away.

The_Rotating_Home_Has_Various_Compartments.jpg Rotating Home
The same thing happens when the owner wants to turn in for the day: the house rotates once again with the wall the television was on now on the ceiling, lowering down to present a hidden bed.

Clarke made sure he used every inch of space to bring the comforts of a large home to a 3x3x3 meter cube area.

The working prototype drew a lot of attention from younger audiences who struggle to find an affordable location to live in. This prototype Clarke and Haride built cost them £50,000, making it an ideal alternative for young homeowners to potentially invest in for the future.

Clarke and Hardie have the Rotating Home on display at The Ideal Home Show in Olympia, London that runs from March 24 to April 9.

The Rotating Home

With the price of traditional homes and rent for apartments in larger cities rising, residents want to find cheaper living solutions. This has prompted companies to create modular cabins, or redesigning storage containers, to serve as a home. George Clarke, a British architect featured in numerous television shows, and designer William Hardie created a prototype of the Rotating Home, a location that contains four rooms in one space by rotating its interior a full 360 degrees in 90-degree intervals.