A porcelain stained art piece called The Human Trace reminds the public of the work factory workers do in the industrial industry.

With advancements in automated technology, more and more blue collar workers are being replaced with AI machinery and equipment. To remind the world that human workers still play a role in industrial factories, anthropologist and curator Ewa Klekot and ceramist Arkadiusz Szwed conceptualized The Human Trace, a project comprised of a collection of porcelain stained blue by its factor workers, and which was showcased at DesignMarch 2017.

Created in Poland's oldest porcelain production factory, factory workers wore gloves dipped in cobalt salts that left imprints on the clay they handled. These stains remained invisible until the clay pieces were fired, which appeared in irregular patterns on the porcelain.

human trace

The Human Trace appeared in the People from the Porcelain Factory collection in Hannesarholt during DesignMarch 2017, Iceland's largest design festival. The festival ran from March 23 to the 26.

DesignMarch 2017

With advancements in automated technology, more and more blue collar workers are being replaced with AI machinery and equipment. To remind the world that human workers still play a role in industrial factories, anthropologist and curator Ewa Klekot and ceramist Arkadiusz Szwed conceptualized The Human Trace, a project comprised of a collection of porcelain stained blue by its factor workers, and which was showcased at DesignMarch 2017.

Created in Poland's oldest porcelain production factory, factory workers wore gloves dipped in cobalt salts that left imprints on the clay they handled. These stains remained invisible until the clay pieces were fired, which appeared in irregular patterns on the porcelain.