The TrocTroc market gives food vouchers for cans and plastic, providing an incentive for cleaning up the environment

Indigenous groups continue to be among the most threatened populations in the world. Places like the Amazon are facing historic problems, such as deforestation, and now must deal with environmental concerns like waste. After witnessing an influx of plastic and cans littering the area, Benki Piyako, a spiritual leader of the Amazon’s Ashaninka tribe, had an idea for a shop that lets customers swap these recyclables for food vouchers. Partnering with House of Indians, he created the TrocTroc market.

The market was established in Acre, which is situated near the borders of Brazil and Peru. In this store, customers can bring in recyclables to be weighed and exchanged for food vouchers. These products are then sent to a nearby recycling plant for processing. The store offers only local produce to support local farmers and the community.

TrocTroc is currently accepting contributions to the project on a crowfunding page. Since there is no real system for recycling in the area, the goal is to create a chain of stores with the same concept.

TrocTroc

Indigenous groups continue to be among the most threatened populations in the world. Places like the Amazon are facing historic problems, such as deforestation, and now must deal with environmental concerns like waste. After witnessing an influx of plastic and cans littering the area, Benki Piyako, a spiritual leader of the Amazon’s Ashaninka tribe, had an idea for a shop that lets customers swap these recyclables for food vouchers. Partnering with House of Indians, he created the TrocTroc market.