Conductive Ink Creates Interactive Device-Controlling Wallpaper

Conductive Ink Creates Interactive Device-Controlling Wallpaper
Design

Conduit installation presents electrical wiring in a beautiful new way

Dave Pinter, PSFK
  • 22 may 2017

Might homes of the future not have any electrical wiring in them at all? That’s a concept explored through a collaboration between the wall covering company Flavor Paper and Brooklyn-based UM Project. ‘Conduct’ is the resulting installation from their collaboration on display at the 2017 Collective Design Fair in New York City. It includes a series of interacting elements that are activated simply by touching the wall surface.

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The secret to the Conduct is a water-based conductive ink that Flavor Paper’s founder Jon Sherman discovered a couple years ago. Wanting to demonstrate this how ink could conduct electricity and power devices, he partnered with François Chambard of UM Project to design a collection of tactile and visual elements that visualize the transmission of electricity.

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The pair began work on the installation back in July of 2016. They arrived at a tile system with a copper ‘switch’ and bridges that connect the conductive ink sections to the devices. There’s no way for someone touching any of the connectors or ink sections to get shocked so everything is safe to touch.

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The physical elements react to electricity with movement, light or sound. ‘Light Box’, for example, is a series of LED lights inclosed in a glass box where each quarter section is activated by a separate touch point. ‘Shadow Shower’ is a large overhead lamp that is activated by a single touchpad.

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‘Light Timer and Moiré’ is activated by a touch which starts an illuminated light bar timer resulting in a rotating acrylic panel to create a moiré pattern.

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‘Fan’ is activated by placing a copper bar on a stand that completes the circuit and turns on a series of fans.

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Installing Conduct required a fine degree of calibration and hours of work from a programmer Chambard said. So covering entire walls with electrified wallpaper is probably not a near future possibility. But the installation shows the wiring that is currently hidden inside walls could one day become an aesthetic and functional addition to interior design.

Collective Design Fair

Might homes of the future not have any electrical wiring in them at all? That’s a concept explored through a collaboration between the wall covering company Flavor Paper and Brooklyn-based UM Project. ‘Conduct’ is the resulting installation from their collaboration on display at the 2017 Collective Design Fair in New York City. It includes a series of interacting elements that are activated simply by touching the wall surface.

+Art
+Arts & Culture
+Collective Design Fair
+Design
+Electricity
+Energy
+technology
+UM Project
+wallpaper

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