The "Connected Aircraft" will have cloud-based and automated systems for maintenance, check-up and passengers' viewing pleasure

So, what can a better Internet connection give a flight? Apparently, a lot. Honeywell and its Aerospace and Defense division is developing new technology that connects planes to the Internet, mimicking the reliability of on-land connection. Broadband bandwidths and greater reliability will soon make the often nightmarish on-board browsing experience a grim memory.

The Honeywell system uses partner Immarsat’s satellite technology, with GlobalXpress Ka-band providing the link between the three Immarsat satellites to the plane. Soon enough, a fourth satellite will be launched. The result will be seamless transitioning from one satellite to the next, avoiding the downtimes that plague current technologies, the report continues.

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On their own blog, Honeywell outlines the key potential of such a system embedded on each flight. For passengers, there is, of course, the chance to enjoy a far more reliable Internet connection; the kind that can handle Netflix or YouTube demands. The more popular in-flight provider, Gogo, is having a tough time delivering on the same promise (which lead to a lawsuit from client American Airlines). Honeywell describes its JetWave connectivity as capable of offering the same level of speed and reliability as you’d get on the ground.

The business of flying also reaps important benefits. Airliners can save on fuel costs just by having a steady stream of weather maps. At present, pilots rely on printed weather maps just before take-off. On a transatlantic flight that lasts for eight hours or more, that kind of information goes stale With a continuous and reliable internet connection, pilots will have weather data that’s always fresh. Right now, for the latest in weather, airplanes still have to rely on airports and other on-ground sources. With access to updated weather data, pilots can better avoid turbulence and plot out the most efficient routes weather-wise.

In Honeywell’s test Boeing 757, or the “Connected Aircraft”, systems that make aircraft maintenance and check-up is more cloud-based and automated. These systems, which rely on JetWave, can cut even more costs for airliners.

Honeywell

So, what can a better Internet connection give a flight? Apparently, a lot. Honeywell and its Aerospace and Defense division is developing new technology that connects planes to the Internet, mimicking the reliability of on-land connection. Broadband bandwidths and greater reliability will soon make the often nightmarish on-board browsing experience a grim memory.

The Honeywell system uses partner Immarsat’s satellite technology, with GlobalXpress Ka-band providing the link between the three Immarsat satellites to the plane. Soon enough, a fourth satellite will be launched. The result will be seamless transitioning from one satellite to the next, avoiding the downtimes that plague current technologies, the report continues.