In Brief

Say goodbye to fake tan or melanomas! A new salt-inducible drug could give you a nice tan without needing to be exposed to any sunlight or UV rays

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital developed a drug called salt-inducible kinase (SIK) that tricks a person’s skin into producing melanin. This causes the individual’s pigment to alter it into a darker shade and subsequently producing a tan without needing prolonged exposure to the sun or UV rays. So far, the researchers have only tested SIK on mice. The results from these tests demonstrate a mouse’s skin producing real melanin, meaning the drug doesn’t create an artificial tan. Following the treatments, the mice’s skin pigment returned to its standard shade.

Commercial development of the drug remains a way off as human trials have not started yet. However, if the drug is approved, it could decrease the likelihood of cancer diagnoses in the near feature.

Salt-inducible Kinase

Image: Skeyndor Cosmética Científica | CC | Image resized

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital developed a drug called salt-inducible kinase (SIK) that tricks a person’s skin into producing melanin. This causes the individual’s pigment to alter it into a darker shade and subsequently producing a tan without needing prolonged exposure to the sun or UV rays. So far, the researchers have only tested SIK on mice. The results from these tests demonstrate a mouse’s skin producing real melanin, meaning the drug doesn’t create an artificial tan. Following the treatments, the mice’s skin pigment returned to its standard shade.