In Brief

Christina Agapakis of Ginkgo Bioworks describes how the incredible feats of biology can be integrated into human-driven design

Christina Agapakis, creative director at Ginkgo Bioworks, discussed how she uses her background in science and collaborates with engineers, designers, artists and social scientists to explore the many unexpected connections between microbiology, technology, art and popular culture.

“I like to say that biology is nanotechnology that works,” said Agapakis, citing biotechnology that uses super strong spider silk in lab experiments for tech products. “Biology does things that we can’t even begin to approach with human technology, but biology can also be designed.”

Here’s the key takeaway:

Consumer biotech is the future

From super-strong spider silk being used in clothing, to fungi furniture, to leather grown in the lab, the researchers at Ginkgo are at the forefront of a movement that’s bringing biology and technology together. This is creating a host of new products and services that use natural materials that create less waste and lower our impact on the environment.

Christina Agapakis, creative director at Ginkgo Bioworks, discussed how she uses her background in science and collaborates with engineers, designers, artists and social scientists to explore the many unexpected connections between microbiology, technology, art and popular culture.

“I like to say that biology is nanotechnology that works,” said Agapakis, citing biotechnology that uses super strong spider silk in lab experiments for tech products. “Biology does things that we can’t even begin to approach with human technology, but biology can also be designed.”