PurpleList Podcast Episode 9: Rethinking Addresses To Make Travel Easier And Safer

PurpleList Podcast Episode 9: Rethinking Addresses To Make Travel Easier And Safer
Delivery & Logistics

At PSFK 2017, what3words COO Clare Jones took to the stage to tell us how what3words is shaking up a century-old institution

Emily Wasik
  • 28 june 2017

Remember the last time you got a postcard from your kooky Auntie on her mid-life crisis trip to Tahiti, or when Seamless got your pizza delivery wrong and sent you two orders of garlic bread? Well, I gotta say it—#firstworldproblems. Many people in the world would die to receive a postcard at all or get food delivered to their very doorstep, but they don’t have postal addresses. But even for people living in the most grid-like, highly “addressed” island of Manhattan, when trying to find a buddy in Central Park or at a large outdoor music festivals, traditional street addresses are virtually useless. UK-based what3words wants to solve both these problems to make package or service deliveries—or simply finding someone—faster and easier. The company has created a grid of tiny 3 x 3-meter squares that spans the entire globe, giving each of them a unique, three-word name. In fact PSFK’s New York offices are located at “else.rush.button.” At PSFK 2017, what3words COO Clare Jones took to the stage to tell us how what3words is shaking up a century-old institution, as well as the countries that are now incorporating 3-word addresses into their mail carrier services.

There are 4 billion people in the world living without addresses. UK-based startup what3words has solved this problem by splitting up the Earth into tiny 3-meter squares and giving each one a unique 3-word address. Their COO Clare Jones took to the PSFK stage to discuss a far less cumbersome alternative to GPS that’s also more accurate than traditional street addresses. The result? People in countries around the world are now able to receive packages and life-saving services in a way that was previously impossible.

Listen to the episode now by subscribing to our PurpleList podcast on iTunes!

Remember the last time you got a postcard from your kooky Auntie on her mid-life crisis trip to Tahiti, or when Seamless got your pizza delivery wrong and sent you two orders of garlic bread? Well, I gotta say it—#firstworldproblems. Many people in the world would die to receive a postcard at all or get food delivered to their very doorstep, but they don’t have postal addresses. But even for people living in the most grid-like, highly “addressed” island of Manhattan, when trying to find a buddy in Central Park or at a large outdoor music festivals, traditional street addresses are virtually useless. UK-based what3words wants to solve both these problems to make package or service deliveries—or simply finding someone—faster and easier. The company has created a grid of tiny 3 x 3-meter squares that spans the entire globe, giving each of them a unique, three-word name. In fact PSFK’s New York offices are located at “else.rush.button.” At PSFK 2017, what3words COO Clare Jones took to the stage to tell us how what3words is shaking up a century-old institution, as well as the countries that are now incorporating 3-word addresses into their mail carrier services.

+Arts & Culture
+Clare Jones
+Design
+Europe
+Fashion
+Luxury
+mail
+mapping
+podcast
+Seamless Delivery
+Sustainability
+technology
+travel
+UK
+USA
+What3Words

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