A robot fish that moves like a real one helps detect changes in aquatic environments without disrupting the ecosystem

Researchers from the Technical University of Madrid, the University of Florence and the Centre for Automation and Robotics have developed a robotic fish that mimics the motions of a real fish while monitoring pH levels. The robot fish is equipped with sensors that detect changes of pH in the water. When it finds areas that are overly acidic or poisonous, the fish will change its swimming pattern to signal a disruption.

The prototype of the robot fish not only resembles the shape of a fish, but also moves like one. It is made from a memory shape alloy that moves like a fish’s backbone, making the robot tester less disruptive to the ecosystems it scouts. The fish is also designed to change its swimming patterns in a variety of water conditions.

UPM Robot Fish


Lead image: Robotic fish prototype via Springwise

Researchers from the Technical University of Madrid, the University of Florence and the Centre for Automation and Robotics have developed a robotic fish that mimics the motions of a real fish while monitoring pH levels. The robot fish is equipped with sensors that detect changes of pH in the water. When it finds areas that are overly acidic or poisonous, the fish will change its swimming pattern to signal a disruption.

The prototype of the robot fish not only resembles the shape of a fish, but also moves like one. It is made from a memory shape alloy that moves like a fish’s backbone, making the robot tester less disruptive to the ecosystems it scouts. The fish is also designed to change its swimming patterns in a variety of water conditions.