To Get More People To Like VR, Barriers To Entry Must Be Overcome

To Get More People To Like VR, Barriers To Entry Must Be Overcome
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PSFK attended the Northside Festival to hear what VR experts are saying about its future

Jiwon Kim
  • 19 june 2017

Virtual reality has certainly stretched the possibilities of gaming and film. Providing a means for a completely immersive experience, VR is different from any other visual medium. It has been embraced by gamers, who can find themselves truly in character once the headset goes on. However, VR has proved a little harder to be adopt in filmmaking. Despite some excellent films created specifically for VR, it has not yet gotten as popular as some hoped, leading to some healthy skepticism over its future.

At Northside Festival in Brooklyn earlier this month, m ss ng p eces founder Ari Kuschnir and Director of Immersive Content Mike Woods were joined by Dessy Levinson, Vice President and Head of Story at 645 Ventures,  in a lively panel discussion.

Naturally, all of the panelists strongly believe in the potential of VR—it is undoubtedly a unique and compelling way to tell stories. They talked about recent documentaries they helped produce, including an NBA documentary from m ss ng p eces that they say truly came alive through the VR medium. VR lets you feel like you are standing right next to the characters, sharing their viewpoint. It also has the potential to leave a more vivid imprint because it more closely resembles lived experience.

However, there is a deficit of solid VR content due to the fact that only a small community has truly invested in the medium, making it difficult to become mainstream. For many of us, VR is interesting—but not enough for us to go out and buy a headset, then hunt for films to watch on it. The panelists also agreed that the barriers to entry are high. Without younger audiences invested in the medium, it will be difficult for VR truly to take off. Fortunately, headsets and other equipment are getting cheaper. With more technology, VR could become a lot more accessible and mainstream, especially if Apple (which has yet to make a mark in VR) gets on board.

Although Kuschnir, Woods and Levinson believe VR’s future is a little unpredictable, they have faith that it will be exciting and permanent. With VR, creatives can take storytelling to a new level, letting anyone experience the story from the inside out.

m ss ng p eces | 645 Ventures


Lead Image: Follow My Lead – The Story of the 2016 NBA Finals via m ss ng p eces

Virtual reality has certainly stretched the possibilities of gaming and film. Providing a means for a completely immersive experience, VR is different from any other visual medium. It has been embraced by gamers, who can find themselves truly in character once the headset goes on. However, VR has proved a little harder to be adopt in filmmaking. Despite some excellent films created specifically for VR, it has not yet gotten as popular as some hoped, leading to some healthy skepticism over its future.

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+Apple
+Augmented & Virtual Reality
+Entertainment
+filmmaking
+gaming
+m ss ng p eces
+NBA
+Virtual Reality
+VR

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