Orii makes accepting calls far easier by using bone conduction and vibrating through a person's finger

Some companies have started to develop headphones that use bone conduction rather than standard audio plugs. Essentially a device that uses bone conduction doesn’t try to channel audio down a person’s ear canal. Instead these headphones vibrate sound around the outside of the wearer’s ear against the tiny bones located near their inner ear. This feeds audio directly to the wearer without anyone else hearing the conversation.
Startup technology company Origami Labs wanted to take this concept a step further and designed a ring which uses bone conduction, called Orii. With Orii, a wearer simply places the ring on their preferred finger and then hold it up to the side of their ear to make phone calls or interact with their smartphone.

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Orii functions similarly to other smart devices by connecting to a person’s smartphone through a Bluetooth signal. With that connection established, a user receives notifications of incoming calls when their ring vibrates and its LED lights flash. Without taking out their phone, a user can place the finger wearing the ring to their ear and begin their conversation as if it was their phone. What's more, the ring was designed with a pair of noise-canceling microphones to prevent environmental sounds from ruining the quality of the call.


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On Orii’s companion application, a user can choose which notifications they wish to receive through the ring. These notifications can either have a ringtone associated with them or flash a specific color using one of the four LED lights on the ring. Both Siri and Google Assistant function through Orii as long as the user simply says “Orii,” before they continue with a command.

Developers even made the ring splash-proof and scratch-resistant. And good news for anyone interested in having it match an outfit as Origami Labs plan to release Orii in three different colors: sandblasted silver, metallic dark gray and matte black.

Origami Labs started a Kickstarter campaign for Orii where backers have already exceeded the $30,000 goal with 23 days left. Should the developers not run into any manufacturing problems, the first batch of Orii rings is slated to be delivered to backers as soon as February 2018.

Orii

Some companies have started to develop headphones that use bone conduction rather than standard audio plugs. Essentially a device that uses bone conduction doesn’t try to channel audio down a person’s ear canal. Instead these headphones vibrate sound around the outside of the wearer’s ear against the tiny bones located near their inner ear. This feeds audio directly to the wearer without anyone else hearing the conversation. Startup technology company Origami Labs wanted to take this concept a step further and designed a ring which uses bone conduction, called Orii. With Orii, a wearer simply places the ring on their preferred finger and then hold it up to the side of their ear to make phone calls or interact with their smartphone. Orii functions similarly to other smart devices by connecting to a person’s smartphone through a Bluetooth signal. With that connection established, a user receives notifications of incoming calls when their ring vibrates and its LED lights flash. Without taking out their phone, a user can place the finger wearing the ring to their ear and begin their conversation as if it was their phone. What's more, the ring was designed with a pair of noise-canceling microphones to prevent environmental sounds from ruining the quality of the call.