A new set of regulatory standards will fight against common gender tropes in advertising

Ads for cleaning products featuring only women and luxury ads depicting men dominating women will soon be denied airtime in the United Kingdom. The Advertising Standards Authority recently put forward a new report that promises to combat ads that promote stereotypical gender roles.

The new rules will also affect ads depicting men struggling with housework (the assumed role of women, minimizing the male's contribution to the household) and ads that typecast, for example, boys to grow up to be scientists and girls to be ballerinas. ASA said that, rather than challenging creatives, the “long-term effect of new standards should be to encourage creative treatments that challenge or reject particular stereotypes, which should diminish the cumulative effect of potential harm.”

Advertising Standards Authority


Lead Image: Iain Watson | CC | Image resized

Ads for cleaning products featuring only women and luxury ads depicting men dominating women will soon be denied airtime in the United Kingdom. The Advertising Standards Authority recently put forward a new report that promises to combat ads that promote stereotypical gender roles.

The new rules will also affect ads depicting men struggling with housework (the assumed role of women, minimizing the male's contribution to the household) and ads that typecast, for example, boys to grow up to be scientists and girls to be ballerinas. ASA said that, rather than challenging creatives, the “long-term effect of new standards should be to encourage creative treatments that challenge or reject particular stereotypes, which should diminish the cumulative effect of potential harm.”