This Rotary Phone Is Actually An Analog Way To Browse The Web

This Rotary Phone Is Actually An Analog Way To Browse The Web
Design

Hear how a browser communicates with a webpage through a rotary phone

Zack Palm
  • 28 july 2017

When ‘Internet’ comes to mind for most people, they imagine reading a webpage off of a monitor. However, a group of students from Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design wanted to transform the way people perceive the Internet by understanding how a browser connects to a webpage. The team took a rotary dial phone and gave it the capacity to communicate with the internet, coining it The Internet Phone. What this did was turn the phone into a browser by getting the user to call a website.

The Internet Phone works by a user dialing in the 12 digit IP address of a website into the rotary phone. That being said, not many people have the IP address of their favorite website on the back of their hand. To help with this, the students created a yellow-page phonebook containing the IP addresses of specific websites. A person using the phone can then flip through the book to find their ideal website and dial the number into the phone and wait to connect to the internet.

When the phone makes an established connection, the user listens as the phone reads the website using a voice-to-speech software, quickly listing the many options typically read on a webpage. The monotone voice lists them as if they were all mashed together in a single sentence, as they are all said in one breath. This is to represent how an actual browser translates the code of website, using the HTML and the CSS, for a person to read it at their leisure.

The_Internet_Phone_Was_Designed_With_Four_Interchangable_Tokens.jpg

To show how a modern user can have multiple perspectives of a webpage, the team created four tokens, each with a different mode. The first mode, the article token, reads the website just like a standard user would skim through a webpage only looking at the written articles someone posted to a website. The developer token focuses on the background code, reading off the website’s HTML content, something not each and every user understands. The incognito token functions similarly to the incognito browser, allowing a user to freely view a webpage without it having it remain on their history. The history token reads back the last five webpages The Internet Phone visited.

The_Internet_Phone_Was_Created_To_Reveal_The_Inner_Workings_Of_The_Internet.jpg

Isak Frosta,
Sebastian Hunkeler, Jens OBel, and James Zhou were the students who brought The Internet Phone to life.

The Internet Phone

When ‘Internet’ comes to mind for most people, they imagine reading a webpage off of a monitor. However, a group of students from Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design wanted to transform the way people perceive the Internet by understanding how a browser connects to a webpage. The team took a rotary dial phone and gave it the capacity to communicate with the internet, coining it The Internet Phone. What this did was turn the phone into a browser by getting the user to call a website.

+Art
+Arts & Culture
+Copenhagen
+Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design
+Culture
+Design
+Europe
+internet
+Luxury
+mobile
+technology

Learn About Our Membership Services

Need Research Help?
As a member you can ask us any research questions and get complimentary research assistance with a 4-day turnaround. Reports inclde stats, quotes, and best-inclass examples on research topics.
Remain Informed & Strategic
We publish several trends reports each month. By becoming a member you will have access to over 100 existing reports, plus a growing catalog of deep topical analysis and debrief-style reports so you always remain in the know.
See Trends Come To Life
Meet your peers and immerse yourself in monthly trend and innovation webinars and discounted conferences.
No search results found.