PSFK takes a look at how wearable tech is making its way into the workplace

As wearable tech becomes more popular, companies are choosing to distribute these devices to their employees for a variety of reasons. A PWC report states that 72% of employees would be happy to use a piece of wearable technology provided by their employer and would allow the employer to collect their personal data. Although the gadgets are not exactly inexpensive, their benefits have the potential to greatly outweigh the costs.

Here are a few examples of how wearable tech is working itself into the workplace.

Equipping employees with wearable fitness trackers to improve health and wellness

Activity trackers such as Fitbit are an investment that can help improve the health and wellness of employees while making them feel good because, well, they're being offered for free. It signals to employees that their employers care about their personal wellbeing. Some companies are choosing to create contests or some sort of awards system to get their employees moving. In some cases, employers are using data from trackers to negotiate health insurance costs with insurers and/or offering employees cheaper health insurance based on their personal fitness data. The logic behind it is quite simple: healthier employees equal increased productivity and fewer sick days.

Creating a better culture by incorporating wearable tech in corporate wellness programs

Beyond tangible health and wellness benefits, these devices also allows employees to create fitness goals and work with colleagues to meet these goals. Fitbit has added functions that foster community engagement, building a closer work culture. Employers can also tie in these gadgets with company-wide events such as marathons and charity engagements.

Preventing work injuries for tradespeople

Snickers Workwear has created the Tracker-1, a prototype wearable product intended to protect people who perform physically demanding jobs. After a survey found that most of these workers struggle with back and knee pain, Snickers Workwear started developing a wearable device that can be attached to work trousers to collect data on factors such as noise levels, knee impact and temperature. The projects raises awareness about potential health risks and issues in the workplace.


Lead Image: Runner Resting via Shutterstock

As wearable tech becomes more popular, companies are choosing to distribute these devices to their employees for a variety of reasons. A PWC report states that 72% of employees would be happy to use a piece of wearable technology provided by their employer and would allow the employer to collect their personal data. Although the gadgets are not exactly inexpensive, their benefits have the potential to greatly outweigh the costs.

Here are a few examples of how wearable tech is working itself into the workplace.