Dentsu Japan created a video using everyday objects for the arms of a clock and incorporated a new item for every minute of the day

Japanese agency Dentsu partnered with Hitotoki, a stationery brand, to create a film in which designers used a number of different objects to act as the hands of a clock. A day’s 1,440 minutes are represented using a different item for every minute with a consistently changing backdrop.

The agency was able to create the film as a single 24-hour cut, showing only the hands of the designers working on the process. The objects include confetti, flowers, bananas, cream puffs, glow sticks, crackers, onions and much, much more. Every time a pair of (human) hands goes to place a new object, the backdrop is pulled away and exchanged for a new one.

The team created three versions of the film for Hitotoki’s website: the real-time version, the digest version and the full version. The digest version takes a look behind the scenes, showing, for example, a large table of items the crew used while they quickly assembled the clocks. All of the items had predetermined times labeled below them. The full version plays the entire 24-hour video from start to finish, with a perspective from above as the designers bring items off-screen to the middle of the table to construct their makeshift clock.

The real-time version plays the entire film the same as the full version, however, it plays during the correct time of the day. If someone were to go to the website at 12:30 pm, they’d see the designer’s hands busily working on getting the objects to read out the same time, before transitioning to work on the next one for 12:31. To make it look more like a clock, the website cut out the sides of the video to play in the shape of a hexagon and included a small ticking sound in the background.

The meaning of this film lies in meaning of Hitotoki, which translates to “precious moment.” If a viewer were to take the time to watch the real time version on Hitotoki’s website, they would watch as a pair of hands carefully construct a minute, bit by bit, using an assortment of objects. It shows that a person who spends time on something they love can make the most out of anything, as long as they apply a little bit of their creativity and imagination.

Hitotoki Clock

Japanese agency Dentsu partnered with Hitotoki, a stationery brand, to create a film in which designers used a number of different objects to act as the hands of a clock. A day’s 1,440 minutes are represented using a different item for every minute with a consistently changing backdrop.

The agency was able to create the film as a single 24-hour cut, showing only the hands of the designers working on the process. The objects include confetti, flowers, bananas, cream puffs, glow sticks, crackers, onions and much, much more. Every time a pair of (human) hands goes to place a new object, the backdrop is pulled away and exchanged for a new one.