Artist Azuma Makoto launched flowers into space to capture one-of-a-kind images of the colorful flora in the stratosphere

Nature’s beauty can be expressed in various ways, but there’s no denying the charm and elegance of flowers. Artist Azuma Makoto uses flora in impossible places and situations, which only further highlights their beauty, in his latest series “In Bloom.”

What makes a better juxtaposition to bright flowers than the cold, dark vacuum of space? Makoto’s fourth installment of a series launches beautiful bouquets into space to get some of the most unique photos. The flowers were launched from the Love Lock Desert in Nevada into the stratosphere, where a camera documents their journey into space. The flowers experienced temperatures as low as -47.02 degrees Fahrenheit, with an average altitude climb of 95,555 feet during a two-hour flight. The series goes back to Makoto’s Exobiotanica in 2014, when the artist launched a 50-year-old bonsai tree into space.

Azuma Makoto

Nature’s beauty can be expressed in various ways, but there’s no denying the charm and elegance of flowers. Artist Azuma Makoto uses flora in impossible places and situations, which only further highlights their beauty, in his latest series “In Bloom.”

What makes a better juxtaposition to bright flowers than the cold, dark vacuum of space? Makoto’s fourth installment of a series launches beautiful bouquets into space to get some of the most unique photos. The flowers were launched from the Love Lock Desert in Nevada into the stratosphere, where a camera documents their journey into space. The flowers experienced temperatures as low as -47.02 degrees Fahrenheit, with an average altitude climb of 95,555 feet during a two-hour flight. The series goes back to Makoto’s Exobiotanica in 2014, when the artist launched a 50-year-old bonsai tree into space.