PSFK 2017: When Designing Wearables, Don’t Put The Technology First

PSFK 2017: When Designing Wearables, Don’t Put The Technology First
Design

Wearable X CEO Billie Whitehouse spoke to PSFK 2017 about designing wearables for all five senses and maintaining a sense of humor

PSFK
  • 7 august 2017

Billie Whitehouse, co-founder and CEO of Wearable X, returned to PSFK 2017 with an update from the 4-year-old company making strides in wearable tech and “designing for touch in a digital age.” Wearable X specializes in haptic feedback, or vibration, with the idea that clothes can communicate with us through a language of touch. Its first product, Fundawear, brought vibrating knickers (as Australian-born Whitehouse says) to couples in long-distance relationships. Whitehouse spoke about Wearable X’s journey in the still emerging world of connected fashion and the recent launch of Nadi X: yoga pants that provide haptic feedback to suggest tweaks in the wearer’s form.

Here are some key takeaways:

Don’t put the technology first

Whitehouse advises wearable designers not to let existing technology infringe on ideas because it changes constantly, becoming cheaper, smaller or able to integrate in different ways. “You have to be able to design really, really big and then come back to the present and see how people want to use it.”

Design for all five senses

Wearable tech is for the wearer, so the experience needs to resonate in all of the ways they interact with it. “We actually think about how our products smell, how they sound and and how they touch your body.”

Have fun with it

Wearable X aims to design with complexity and humor (with a product like Fundawear, how can you not?). Whitehouse cites the Australian phrase, “You have to be able to take the piss out of yourself,” which is to say you have to be a little bit self-deprecating to be taken seriously.

Wearable X

Billie Whitehouse, co-founder and CEO of Wearable X, returned to PSFK 2017 with an update from the 4-year-old company making strides in wearable tech and “designing for touch in a digital age.” Wearable X specializes in haptic feedback, or vibration, with the idea that clothes can communicate with us through a language of touch. Its first product, Fundawear, brought vibrating knickers (as Australian-born Whitehouse says) to couples in long-distance relationships. Whitehouse spoke about Wearable X’s journey in the still emerging world of connected fashion and the recent launch of Nadi X: yoga pants that provide haptic feedback to suggest tweaks in the wearer’s form.

+apparel
+billie whitehouse
+Design
+Fashion
+fitness / sport
+haptic feedback
+IoT
+psfk 2017
+sport & fitness
+technology
+USA
+wearables

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