Artist Yukiko Morita turned her experience in baking into art, making fully functional lamps out of real loaves of bread

There’s nothing quite like a fresh loaf of good bread. Now gourmands can further highlight their appreciation of this staple by getting their very own bread lamp, made out of an actual loaf of bread.

Artist Yukiko Morita debuted these formerly-edible light fixtures at Maison et Object 2017, an interior design fair in Paris. Morita is a former baker who took her passion for bread into her new work by baking loaves of bread and turning them into lamps, calling it the Pampshade collection. The process is fairly simple: Once the bread is cool, she removes the interior part of the bread through a small slit, coats the bread in a layer of resin to keep it from rotting, shapes it and adds LED lights and batteries to make the bread light up. Morita made 300 prototypes before arriving at the perfect lamp.

The Pampshade collection, currently in seven varieties, is available to customers both within and outside of Japan. Small breads and croissants cost 6,760¥ (approximately $70), while larger loaves and baguettes run from 16,200¥ to 20,410¥ ($147 to $186).

Pampshade

There’s nothing quite like a fresh loaf of good bread. Now gourmands can further highlight their appreciation of this staple by getting their very own bread lamp, made out of an actual loaf of bread.

Artist Yukiko Morita debuted these formerly-edible light fixtures at Maison et Object 2017, an interior design fair in Paris. Morita is a former baker who took her passion for bread into her new work by baking loaves of bread and turning them into lamps, calling it the Pampshade collection. The process is fairly simple: Once the bread is cool, she removes the interior part of the bread through a small slit, coats the bread in a layer of resin to keep it from rotting, shapes it and adds LED lights and batteries to make the bread light up. Morita made 300 prototypes before arriving at the perfect lamp.