In Brief

Drawings from late architect Zaha Hadid are compiled in a book geared towards children in an effort to grow their imagination

A typical children’s book usually contains pretty drawings and elements of fantasy to inspire the imagination and innocence of being a child. Jeanette Winter who has authored and illustrated over a dozen children’s books decided to take a new approach with her latest book, introducing kids to the wonders of architecture. In particular, Winter decided to focus on the buildings designed by legendary architect Zaha Hadid.

Inspired by photos of Hadid’s work, Winter spent the last seven years writing and illustrating “The World Is Not A Rectangle: A Portrait of Architect Zaha Hadid”. In the book, she covers everything from Hadid’s upbringing in Iraq to the extraordinary monuments that led her to be the first woman to win the Pritzker Architect Award. Winter wanted to create a book that would include the wonder of her work while also presenting something as complicated as architecture in a very simple way for children to understand.

“I’m writing for children with big dreams,” said, Winter. She also felt the book could be a great inspiration to young girls who hope to create and accomplish as much as Zaha Hadid did in her life.

Jeanette Winter

A typical children’s book usually contains pretty drawings and elements of fantasy to inspire the imagination and innocence of being a child. Jeanette Winter who has authored and illustrated over a dozen children’s books decided to take a new approach with her latest book, introducing kids to the wonders of architecture. In particular, Winter decided to focus on the buildings designed by legendary architect Zaha Hadid.

Inspired by photos of Hadid’s work, Winter spent the last seven years writing and illustrating “The World Is Not A Rectangle: A Portrait of Architect Zaha Hadid”. In the book, she covers everything from Hadid’s upbringing in Iraq to the extraordinary monuments that led her to be the first woman to win the Pritzker Architect Award. Winter wanted to create a book that would include the wonder of her work while also presenting something as complicated as architecture in a very simple way for children to understand.